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Vaporizers

Propane, like water, is a "compound" with its own set of chemical properties. At atmospheric pressure, water, a substance that we are all very familiar with, boils -- that is to say goes through a phase change from liquid to vapor -- at 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius). Propane, on the other hand, as a result of its particular set of chemical properties, boils at -44 degrees Fahrenheit (-42 degrees Celsius). Therefore, as long as your propane tank is stored in an area that is at least -44 degrees F. (at sea level), the propane in your tank is undergoing phase change, and the pressure will be great enough to give off at least some vapor pressure.

Now, to complicate things, the phase change of propane, just like that of water, involves the transfer of energy. You cannot boil water without an outside source of heat from, say, the burner on your stove. Further, the more energy applied (the hotter the burner), the faster your water is boiled, and the faster it is expelled into the atmosphere as vapor. Similarly, with propane, a warmer ambient temperature (above -44 F) results in a higher rate of vaporization and greater vapor pressure, allowing you to draw more vapor off the top of your cylinder. Based upon this discussion, it should be fairly evident that ambient temperature has a direct effect on the ability to run your equipment. If your equipment is asking for more vapor pressure than can be provided naturally by ambient heat, it may shut down (or merely provide less heat than you require).

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120A Vaporizer / Regulator

$287.72

C-11A28

$140.00

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